YOU ONLY NEED

REMOTE DRIVERS

WHEN YOU EXPECT THEM TO FAIL


LED DRIVER QUICK FACTS

While old HID lights used AC power, LEDs use DC power

It can take more than 700V of DC power to reach a fixture from the bottom of a pole

If designed right, a powerful LED fixture can utilize safe 48V of DC power

Lower DC voltage is much safer and can dramatically increase fixture lifespan

Sportsbeams designs, engineers and helps manufacture our OWN drivers

Our sophisticated drivers allow us to control current CCT and RGB LEDs in the same fixture 

Many sports lighting companies buy their drivers from a 3rd party

Drivers should be able to monitor and report voltage, status, temperature and more


OUR DRIVER FEATURES

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  • custom aluminum die cast housing with precisely engineered heat fins reduces heat by over 20%
  • HOUSING Sealed with FOAM-IN-PLACE  gasket ensuring better than ip-67 water ingress protection
  • board is potted in heat-conducting resin that further protects from water and heat damage
  • stainless steel, water-tight glands allow power and data cables in and nothing else
  • All power supplies ready to be included in our exclusive redundant array of independent drivers (RAID) system

R.A.I.D. SYSTEM

Even though we design, engineer and help manufacture the most advanced sports lighting drivers available, it's still the most vulnerable component on any LED fixture. To ensure industry-leading performance and reliability, we're pushing our drivers to be even better. Our new, patent-pending Redundant Array of Independent Drivers (RAID) System is an industry-changing approach to ensure that our fixtures last for years.

R.A.I.D. Summary

Our R.A.I.D. System uses a smart controller to share power among a group of fixtures in the unlikely event that a driver fails. In the example from the video, we have three fixtures, four drivers and a R.A.I.D. controller. The spare driver is dormant until the technician cuts the power to one of the fixtures.

When that happens, the R.A.I.D. controller instantly activates the spare driver. When the technician cuts the power to the next driver, the three fixtures share the power of two drivers at decreased light output. When the power to the third out of four power supplies is cut, the three fixtures share the last driver and light output is decreased again.